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Mar 1, 2014

AGM 2014

 
The Section Board invites members of the Sweden Section to the Section’s Annual General Meeting 2014, to be held on March 20, at KTH, Lindstedsvägen 3, 3tr, Huvudbyggnaden, föreläsningssalen E2.  The 2014 AGM will have the following agenda:
 
  1. 17:30    Registration and sandwiches.
  2. 18:00 – 19:00 AGM (for meeting-agenda see the by-laws at this website).
  3. 19:00 – 20:00 Scientific lecture by invited guest(s).
 
Please re-visit this site regularly, as it will be updated several times before the meeting. See also http://www.kth.se/places/room/A43:03/1203
 
Sweden Section Board

Dec 21, 2013

Professor Foster´s Distinguished Lecturer Tour of Sweden and Finland


(organized by SIT-Chapter)

Program:


Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm
Date and time: January 23 at 15.15
Location: Room 3-221, School of Technology and Health at the KTH Campus South, Flemingsberg.  

What Makes Medical Technology Work

Abstract
This talk will explore the complex interplay between the development of technology and the social and human impacts of technology, focusing on the important medical problem of screening for breast cancer. I will contrast two different technologies: infrared imaging of the breast and X-ray mammography. Over the past half century there have been numerous attempts to develop thermal imaging systems to detect breast cancer. After decades of research, evidence is still lacking that it works, at least in any medically significant way. The few thermography systems that have gained regulatory (FDA) approval have done so with narrow indications for use that essentially preclude access to viable markets. By contrast, tens of millions of women in the US alone are being screened for breast cancer by X-ray mammography every year. But screening for breast cancer is presently controversial, with fierce disputes among physicians and health groups about the tradeoffs between the benefits (saving lives by early detection of cancer) and harms (from overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment). Making medical technology "work" in this area raises subtle issues that extend far beyond technical issues alone.

-----

Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg 
Date and time: January 21 at 13:15  
Location: Room HC2, Hörsalsvägen 16

A Word Awash with Wireless Devices: Addressing Potential Harms of the Wireless Revolution 
 
Abstract:  The benefits of wireless technology are well known, but the potential harms need to be considered as well. I will focus on several possible harms of wireless technology and ethical issues that arise. (a) ethics of research on adverse effects of RF energy. The wireless revolution has led to an increase in levels of exposure to the population to radiofrequency energy, albeit at very low levels compared to international guidelines. While the scientific evidence is generally unsupportive of claims of health hazards of RF energy at such low levels, the scientific literature is mixed and confused in many respects. The level of confusion is increasing with the emergence of many new open access journals, many with low or nonexistent standards of peer review, and the recent appearance in them of papers that report biological effects of exposure to RF energy at low levels. Some government agencies have called for technology-specific research on possible effects of RF exposure from wireless devices. To what extent are creators of wireless technology ethically obligated to address such concerns? And if more bio-effects research is needed, how should it be conducted, by whom, and how should it be evaluated? (b) ethical responsibilities to "electro-sensitive" individuals. Many individuals believe themselves to be sensitive to RF energy from devices such as Wi-Fi, SmartMeters, mobile phones and base stations, many reporting symptoms that prevent them from functioning fully in modern society. What are the ethical obligations of society towards these individuals? (c) wireless practice of medicine. The introduction of smartphones has led to an explosive growth of "apps" including many designed to provide medical information or services to consumers. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration has expressed concern about smartphone apps that are, in effect, medical devices, and noted its intention to require evidence of safety and effectiveness for such apps.  I review this issue with reference to apps for dermatology, a particularly troubling class of apps. The advent of wireless apps as medical devices raises urgent ethical and regulatory issues for app developers.


Oulu University, Oulu, Finland 
Date and time: January 28 at 9:00
Location: Room TS101, Univ. of Oulu, Tietotalo 1, E-door

What Makes Medical Technology Work

Abstract:
This talk will explore the complex interplay between the development of technology and the social and human impacts of technology, focusing on the important medical problem of screening for breast cancer. I will contrast two different technologies: infrared imaging of the breast and X-ray mammography. Over the past half century there have been numerous attempts to develop thermal imaging systems to detect breast cancer. After decades of research, evidence is still lacking that it works, at least in any medically significant way. The few thermography systems that have gained regulatory (FDA) approval have done so with narrow indications for use that essentially preclude access to viable markets. By contrast, tens of millions of women in the US alone are being screened for breast cancer by X-ray mammography every year. But screening for breast cancer is presently controversial, with fierce disputes among physicians and health groups about the tradeoffs between the benefits (saving lives by early detection of cancer) and harms (from overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment). Making medical technology "work" in this area raises subtle issues that extend far beyond technical issues alone.

Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTI) 
Date and time: January 30 at 15:00
Location: Room J1630, BTI 

What Makes Medical Technology Work

Abstract:
This talk will explore the complex interplay between the development of technology and the social and human impacts of technology, focusing on the important medical problem of screening for breast cancer. I will contrast two different technologies: infrared imaging of the breast and X-ray mammography. Over the past half century there have been numerous attempts to develop thermal imaging systems to detect breast cancer. After decades of research, evi dence is still lacking that it works, at least in any medically significant way. The few thermography systems that have gained regulatory (FDA) approval have done so with narrow indications for use that essentially preclude access to viable markets. By contrast, tens of millions of women in the US alone are being screened for breast cancer by X-ray mammography every year. But screening for breast cancer is presently controversial, with fierce disputes among physicians and health groups about the tradeoffs between the benefits (saving lives by early detection of cancer) and harms (from overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment). Making medical technology "work" in this area raises subtle issues that extend far beyond 
----------------------------------------
Biography Kenneth R. Foster
Kenneth R. Foster received his PhD in physics in 1971. Since 1977 he has been at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is Professor of Bioengineering. His technical work involves studies on the interaction of nonionizing radiation and biological systems, ranging from biophysical principles of interaction to dosimetry and exposure assessment. A major secondary interest is the interaction of technology and society. For a number of years he has taught a course to biomedical engineers on "what makes medical technology work". In addition to more than 100 articles in peer reviewed journals, he is coauthor or coeditor of two books on risk assessment and the law. He is a fellow of the IEEE and of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the Editor-in-Chief of BioMedical Engineering Online, and has been involved for many years with evaluating health effects of nonionizing radiation and participating in standards setting committees.


Aug 21, 2013
Lina Bertling Tjernberg

Voting in the PES society

A big battle is going to take place in the PES Society in view of electing officers for the key posts.  In the past term of office, Professor Lina Bertling Tjernberg held the post of Treasurer.  She is now a candidate for the post of Secretary, which may be even more influential than that of treasurer.  Lina Bertling is going to face a tough battle to win over another extremely competent candidate, Professor Minni Thomas of the Jamia Millia University in New Delhi.  We can help Lina Bertling by voting for her.  Among the members of Sweden Section Lina is currently placed highest in the IEEE hierarchy.  Let us help her continue, thus wielding influence and making our section more visible internationally.  

Lina´s position statement accepting her candidacy can be found by opening this link (at time point 43:07):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOSNHtR9IEo&list=PLbB-7HFBiDxF5YBdboVqSaDo5Qc5KYR7i&index=1

2013-IEEE-PES-Elections-LinaBertling-Secretary.pdf

                               


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